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Electric Lighting and Other Old Electrical Technology
 
 
 
 
 
Electric lighting Links under the images below lead to the rest of the stories:
 
 
 
 
The Ancient City Lights of Jerusalem
 
At one time, eight carbon arc searchlights illuminated ancient Jerusalem, and a substantial portion at that, by casting their beams a great distance from the circular Christian Church of the Ascension on the Mount of Olives.[1]  Arculf (Arculfus), a Frankish bishop, perhaps of Prigueux, who visited and explored the Holy Land, accompanied by Peter, a Bergundian monk, who acted as a guide, reported the details and effects of these eight brilliant lights—and some others also. . . .
 
 
 
 
Ancient Electricity in Egypt
 
The ancient Egyptian “paintings offer few representations of lamps, torches, or any other kind of light,” pointed out the great Egyptologist John Gardner Wilkinson, author of Materia Hieroglyphica and Manners and Customs of the Ancient Egyptians.  But why—when they repeatedly illustrated almost every other Egyptian article?  The answer lies in the fact that modern authorities are simply not looking for electric lights on the ancient monuments so they simply do not recognize them! . . .

 

 

 
Ancient Movie Houses
 
Thomas Edison is credited with building the first movie theater, shown in the photograph above.  However, in truth, the ancient Egyptians and Hebrews may have watched movies on the walls of dark chambers long before him, if we are to believe what Jonathan Gray and the Bible point out. . . .  
 
 
 
A Book Review on Ancient Electric Lighting
 
"This trade paperback was a very pleasant and informative surprise.  A heavily illustrated book that explores the possibility that ancient humanity had harnessed the power of electricity.  Preposterous you say, well Mr. Radka, a retired broadcast engineer may just change your mind.  His investigation into this possibility was an exhaustive effort.  With a library of more than 5,000 books at his disposal, his research displays a multitude of examples where the ancients used batteries, telescopes, mirror weapons, as well as carbon arc lighting. Radka’s arguments are very intriguing.  He shows evidence that several ancient structures such as the Pharos Lighthouse of Alexandria, which was one of the seven wonders of the ancient world, was powered by carbon arc lights and battery jars. . . . "
 
 
 
Carbon Arc Street Lights of London and Paris
 
  The carbon arc street lights in the photographs below were taken by W. M. Van Der Weyde, for Century magazine's Christmas edition, the December 1913 issue.  The eight photographs (our tinting) followed the magazine's heading: "London and Paris After Dark."  Van Der Weyde took the first six in London and the last two in Paris. World War I broke out the following year, and until its end in 1918, these arc lights were naturally extinguished to protect the cities from German bombardment. . . .
 
 
Atlantis Electric Lighting in America
 
Atlantis electric lighting and its migration from the ancient continent of Atlantis to America seem to be a distinct possibility according to an article by Larry Brian Radka.  It appeared in Issue No. 73 of Ancient American magazine and runs as follows: . . .
 
 
 
 
Electric batteries, 2000 years ago!!!  Surprised?  No need to be, really,” declared Willard F. M. Gray, an electrical engineer for General Electric.  “There were some pretty smart metal workers in the ancient city of Baghdad, Persia [now Iraq].  They did a lot of fine work in steel, gold, and silver.  You may wonder what this had to do with electric batteries.  It seems that copper vases, some of whose ages go back 4000 years, were unearthed several years ago which had designs plated on them in gold or silver, even some were plated with antimony.”  In his editorial titled “A Shocking Discovery,” in a 1963 edition of the prestigious Journal of the Electrochemical Society, he also added: “Occasionally, we feel a bit smug about our tremendous advances in the nuclear science and the like, but when we are scooped by some ancient metal smiths we are most assuredly brought down to earth and humbled.  It will ever be so.”[i] . . .
 
 
 
Ancient Hebrew Electric Light Technology
 
The evidence for Hebrew electric arc light technology in antiquity is evidenced in the Bible's Old Testament's accounts of the Garden of Eden, Ark of the Covenant, and Solomon's temple as well as in later works.  An ancient carbon arc light can be traced back to the biblical beginning of mankind.  Genesis 3:24 says the gods (elohim)* "placed at the east of the garden of Eden cherubim [carbons] and a flaming sword [a sharp electric arc light blazing between them] which turned every way [just like the rotating searchlight above]."  At a much later time, electric lighting was used by Moses to represent the spirit of Yahweh below and to light up the Hebrew god's home in the Ark or Arc of the Covenant. . . .
 
 
 
“Spotlight to Searchlight,” you say.  “Isn’t a spotlight the same as a searchlight?” . . . .
 

 
 
 



 
This page was last modified on Wednesday, January 20, 2016